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Wednesday, January 12, 2022

Persimmon Jam. Fruity, chunky and so delicious!

Persimmon Jam is a fruity, chunky delicious jam that you will want to make! Perfect on toast and yes, to give as a gift to a friend!

We had a bowl of persimmons left when all the Christmas feasting ended. And being one to make the most of everything, I decided to research Persimmon Jam. Which turned out to be a good thing, because it is delicious! You probably have come to realize by now, I believe preserving and canning can (and should?) happen all year long. For this one simple reason, food grows, ripens, and is shipped to the marketplace all year long. If we only can and preserve in the summertime, we are missing out!

Since I had never made Persimmon Jam I started right in and waded through many different recipe offerings on the internet, finally settling on one in particular. As I wanted a simple recipe. A recipe where the flavor would be pure and not a mixture of two or three different fruit combined. This simple three-ingredient recipe for Persimmon Jam is exactly what I was looking for! Yes, only three ingredients, fruit, sugar, and lemon juice...



Persimmons can be a bit labor-intensive for jam-making because they must be peeled. Unlike many other fruits used in jam, the skin on a Persimmon is warrior tough, but fortunately quite easy to peel away. As such, they don't come to market with many blemishes...for that, you can thank that outer skin! Once peeled you will need to slice crosswise or in wedges and remove any seeds. I have been cooking with Persimmons for a few years now and this was the first time I came across a seed! Once the persimmons are peeled and sliced, the rest of the recipe is simply jam-making!




Some thoughts on this recipe:

You will want to cook the sliced fruit until it can be mashed easily with a potato masher. 

Once the fruit is cooked and mashed, you could let it cool and place it in the refrigerator and finish the recipe the following day, if desired.

If you prefer you may freeze Persimmon Jam in freezer jars or containers. In our little home, I do not have the storage space in my freezer and have included canning instructions. 

For those new to home canning, here is the basic process, from the National Center for Home Food Preserving.  Don't let being new to canning stop you, it is a lovely way to bring something special to your family meals. 

Ingredients needed for this recipe:
  • persimmons
  • lemon juice
  • sugar
You will also need the following:
  • kitchen knife
  • paring knife
  • cutting board
  • large bowl
  • large stock-pot
  • water bath canner
  • jars or freezer containers
  • flats and rings 
  • measuring cups
  • potato masher
Now we are ready to begin!



Persimmon Jam

4 pounds of Persimmons
1/2 c lemon juice
2 c sugar

Peel the persimmons, slice crosswise or into thin wedges to be able to locate and remove any seeds. 

Place the sliced fruit and the lemon juice into a large stockpot. Bring to a boil over medium heat, reduce heat to low, cover and let cook until the fruit is soft and will mash easily. This could take anywhere from 30 to 60 minutes depending upon the fruit. 

NOTE: the more cooked the fruit, the softer the jam texture will be. 



Remove the cooked fruit from the burner, using the potato masher, mash the fruit until it is mashed and has a consistent texture throughout. 

Return the stockpot to the burner, and over medium-high heat, add the sugar. Stir constantly until the sugar is mixed into the mashed fruit, and begins to give off some juice. 


Cook stirring frequently over medium heat, the fruit sugar mixture will slowly thicken as the juices evaporate. The thicker the fruit mixture becomes, the more stirring you will need to do. When the mixture "mounds" on a spoon, it will be ready to jar. 

Remove the stockpot from the burner, and proceed as desired. 

if you want to freeze the jam, let it cool in the pan until warm, then jar it up and place it in the refrigerator to chill completely, then into the freezer for long-term storage. 

if you want to water-bath can the jam to be shelf-stable, fill prepared 8 oz jam jars with the jam leaving a 1/4 inch headspace. Attach the flats and rings as per manufacturers' directions, and process in the water-bath canner for 10 minutes, adjusting for high altitude if needed. Any leftover jam not going into a jar for processing can be enjoyed now!

Carefully remove jam jars from the canner when the time is completed, let them cool on the counter before storing them in the cupboard. 



TIP:  If you will be sealing into jars with a water bath process, I would recommend getting the canner ready, filled as needed with water, and begin heating on a medium-high burner. You can always turn it down to medium-low if it comes to a boil before you need it. Then return to high heat when the jars are placed in the canner. Begin counting the minutes once the water has returned to a full boil. 

Storage options for Persimmon Jam. Once opened the jam will last in the refrigerator for up to 6 months, even though it will not last that long! The sealed jars are shelf-stable for up to one year, and the freezer jam should keep for six to eight months. 


UPDATE:  For your convenience, a "copy and paste" version of Persimmon Jam has been included below. 
You may also enjoy Persimmon Vinaigrette, especially if eating persimmons is new for your family. Once you try them, you will want to enjoy them often!
Featured recipe at: 
Scratch Made Foods! & DIY Homemade Household is featured at A Morning Cup of Joe!
Scratch Made Foods! & DIY Homemade Household is featured at A Morning Cup of Joe!

#wholefoodingredients

#scratchmadefoodforyourfamily

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Printable "copy and paste" version:
Persimmon Jam

4 pounds of Persimmons
1/2 c lemon juice
2 c sugar

Peel the persimmons, slice crosswise or into thin wedges to be able to locate and remove any seeds. 

Place the sliced fruit and the lemon juice into a large stockpot. Bring to a boil over medium heat, reduce heat to low, cover and let cook until the fruit is soft and will mash easily. This could take anywhere from 30 to 60 minutes depending upon the fruit. 

NOTE: the more cooked the fruit, the softer the jam texture will be. 

Remove the cooked fruit from the burner, using the potato masher, mash the fruit until it is mashed and has a consistent texture throughout. 

Return the stockpot to the burner, and over medium-high heat, add the sugar. Stir constantly until the sugar is mixed into the mashed fruit, and begins to give off some juice. 

Remove the cooked fruit from the burner, using the potato masher, mash the fruit until it is mashed and has a consistent texture throughout. 

Return the stockpot to the burner, and over medium-high heat, add the sugar. Stir constantly until the sugar is mixed into the mashed fruit, and begins to give off some juice. 

Cook stirring frequently over medium heat, the fruit sugar mixture will slowly thicken as the juices evaporate. The thicker the fruit mixture becomes, the more stirring you will need to do. When the mixture "mounds" on a spoon, it will be ready to jar. 

Remove the stockpot from the burner, and proceed as desired. 

if you want to freeze the jam, let it cool in the pan until warm, then jar it up and place it in the refrigerator to chill completely, then into the freezer for long-term storage. 

if you want to water-bath can the jam to be shelf-stable, fill prepared 8 oz jam jars with the jam leaving a 1/4 inch headspace. Attach the flats and rings as per manufacturers' directions, and process in the water-bath canner for 10 minutes, adjusting for high altitude if needed. Any leftover jam not going into a jar for processing can be enjoyed now!

Carefully remove jam jars from the canner when the time is completed, let them cool on the counter before storing them in the cupboard. 

TIP:  If you will be sealing into jars with a water bath process, I would recommend getting the canner ready, filled as needed with water, and begin heating on a medium-high burner. You can always turn it down to medium-low if it comes to a boil before you need it. Then return to high heat when the jars are placed in the canner. Begin counting the minutes once the water has returned to a full boil. 

Storage options for Persimmon Jam. Once opened the jam will last in the refrigerator for up to 6 months, even though it will not last that long! The sealed jars are shelf-stable for up to one year, and the freezer jam should keep for six to eight months. 

~~~~





 





Would you like to comment?

  1. Oh, my! I our whole family adores persimmons! We wish we lived where they grew well! They are such a treat!

    We visited California v several years back, and one hostess would freeze her abundant persimmons and then take them and run them through her Champion Juicer with frozen bananas to make the most wonderful all fruit ice cream! Nothing better!

    Thanks for sharing your recipe! I’m sure it’s delicious!

    Laurie
    Ridge Haven Homestead

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We agree, and looking into a variety that might grow in our backyard as well.

      Delete
  2. Thanks so much for linking up at the 25 and Done Link Party 1. Shared onto social media!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dee you are welcome, and thanks for hosting such wonderful link parties to share with!

      Delete
  3. I make jam, but I never made persimmon. I've eaten it though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are new to persimmons, but so far, they have been a surprising and enjoying flavor. This jam is pretty darn good if I say so myself. Thanks for stopping by, I appreciate it.

      Delete
  4. When I was a kid my older sister's boyfriend came over and had a small fruit with him, he said his mom made a pie using them and wanted me to taste it to see if I'd like a pie. I tried it, it was a persimmon which wasn't ripe and was so bitter! Ruined persimmons for me, but I do love the way they look sliced.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. While I am not an expert in any way, I have only used the squatty type as they are the sweetest when ripe. I have served a chocolate cheesecake with a slice of persimmon and it was good. But yes, you are correct, they must be ripe to be sweet.

      Delete
  5. Visiting again to say thanks so much for linking up at the Unlimited Link Party 66. Pinned!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dee, you are welcome, thanks for hosting the Unlimited Link Party!

      Delete
  6. I love persimmons - especially the fuji. I eat them whole, skin and all!! Thanks for sharing at the What's for Dinner party. I appreciate your posts - have a fabulous week,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MBFML, you are welcome, and thanks for hosting What's For Dinner Sunday!

      Delete
  7. Persimmons are really under-rated!! Thanks for sharing at the Share the Wealth Party! I appreciate it - Have a great week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MBFML, you are welcome, and thanks for hosting Share the Wealth Party!

      Delete
  8. Melynda, I'm with you. I want to taste the pure flavor of the persimmons, not a mixture of two or three fruits. Persimmon, lemon juice, sugar. Perfect!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We make a lot of jam in our household, and this one was a lovely taste surprise! Thanks for stopping by, I appreciate it!

      Delete
  9. Back to say thanks for linking up at the Sunday Sunshine Blog Hop!

    Blessings,
    Laurie
    Ridge Haven Homestead

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Laurie, thanks for stopping by, and thank you for hosting The Sunday Sunshine Blog Hop!

      Delete
  10. Your persimmon jam recipe brings back wonderful memories of picking persimmons with my father and sister when I was growing up. Happy New Year, Kippi

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Kippi, and thanks for taking a moment to stop and chat, I appreciate it!

      Delete

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